The motivation of people

Today I stumbled across a series of tweets that Clay Johnston sent about Parks and Recreation. Clay is a doer, he is known to break down barriers and work through how to make the impossible possible. Clay also came to Webstock in 2013 and I was fortunate enough to attend his workshop.

Clay’s tweet series is below:

This whole topic has been a hot point of mine whenever I am asked to look at Innovation processes within corporations. Motivation is key, you cannot just ignore it. There are people who will do anything, using their own spare time to drive innovative and ideas they’re passionate about. Whether it’s their day job or their own project, there are people who live to work (as Clay outlined above). However, there are people who don’t work that way, that way sounds ridiculous to them. They go home when it’s time, they indulge in their life, rather than work. These are people who work to live.

The problem I have is that the latter type of people are often told they’re not innovative or passionate and that is just not true. They have different priorities then others. This does not mean they don’t have ideas or are any less passionate then someone else.

I was very much a live to work person, however some serious health issues a few years ago forced me to to move into a work to live motivation. I fluctuate between the two nowadays. I’m disgustingly passionate, I just can’t stop working on things that excite me. It doesn’t mean I’m more passionate then others, if anything it probably means I’m too excited and impatient.

If you’re a manager or someone running innovation incubators, just be conscious of the people you’re interacting with. As much as you’re aware of someones personality, also be aware of what motivates them and how to keep them interested and engaged.

Feature image by Flickr user Hartwig HKD.

The month of chaos

I am hanging on by the tips of my fingers, riding this month out. February is always chaotic and I’ve been doing some thinking recently to understand why. I have come to the conclusion that this month is busy because of one thing. Every facet of my life is busy.

In the business world, February is usually when most boards start to get back into the swing of things. In my normal day job as a software architect it is the time where we help prep new projects to go to the board for investment cases. There is usually a stack of new projects in February because of the Christmas holidays and people being on holiday. In my second job I have to prepare by reading board papers and to meet up with my fellow councillors.

It is no secret I am the woman of many side projects. It is usually during the time of January I collect a few new projects, hopefully while losing or passing on a few projects to others. It is just who I am, I like to keep myself busy with things I am absolutely passionate about. Sometimes these ideas just happen to be quite aspirational items, however it does take until February for the organising to start kicking off.

With this month also brings a lot of wonderful birthdays, including my own. Many of my close friends celebrate their ageing in style. Weekends are jam packed full of events and I’m grateful to have such amazing friends.

So the start of this weekend I sit writing this. Thankful for the cancellation of plans this weekend to allow me a few days off. This post may seem like a whine or that I’m ungrateful, far from it. It’s a break down so that I can understand and know what to do next year. Maybe I go to the extreme and take a month off to go travelling around the world instead? Maybe I pre-book out an ‘Amber day’ within each of the weekends next February.

Header image is courtesy of Flickr user Solid_shift.

The Craft Queer Project

Go get your t-shirt now!

The Bottleneck

This all came about because of a can of Garage Project ‘Beer’ and a permanent marker. But lets start at the beginning.

2014 saw some really great discussions start up about minorities and representation in the New Zealand beer scene. Most notably the Craft Beer Calandar, and a bit more talk about women in the beer scene, both as consumers and professionals. ‘Craft’ beer has been pretty much the exclusive property of middle class white men for a long time, but I hope we’re seeing the first signs of change (types the middle class white male). But it is wonderful to see some conversations and change happening, so lets keep it going.

Today I want to talk about queers in the beer scene. And you know what? I’m going to start by being fairly positive. Because right now, our particular little pool (that is the breweries, beer bars and beer events of Wellington) is…

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